Types of Alocasia (18 Alocasia Plants You’ll Love)

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Alocasias are among the most stunning and striking houseplants you can grow, and their big, shiny leaves will give your house the feel of a lush, tropical forest. However, there are hundreds of beautiful varieties of Alocasia plants in various colors, sizes, and forms, even if most people are familiar with only one or two types. I’ve selected 18 Jewel Alocasia cultivars here that is worthwhile trying to cultivate indoors. Which one do you prefer?

Why Grow Alocasia Plants?

You’re probably here because you’re an atypical wild gardener. You’ve discovered the best way to keep tomatoes happy and believe that bonsai art is easy, but orchids have never been a problem for you and you don’t know what the controversy is about!

The care of Alocasia isn’t easy, but if you can master it, you’ll be rewarded with an impressive home plant. Alocasia plants provide a natural, tropical look to your house, although they’re incredibly high maintenance and can punish you if you misread their growing conditions, even a tiny way off.

Alocasia is a broad genus of perennial flowering plants in the Araceae family. There are 90 species of alocasia that are recognized. However, hundreds of cultivars also have fantastic different shapes, sizes, and shades.

Alocasia plants are unique because, regardless of size, they have a striking appearance simply due to the proportions of their leaf size and height. And that’s not even mentioning the fantastic textures and colors available to the leaves.

This article will provide helpful tips for caring for the alocasia plant, with a comprehensive collection of the most well-known alocasia species accessible, but beware, some are uncommon.

Alocasia Plant Care:

Alocasia plants are recognized for being, admit it, excessive. While you’ll not be handing it ice cubes as an odd person (yeah, I’m talking to orchid lovers), every development aspect must be carefully performed and maintained.

While the growing conditions might seem easy enough, combining them into a plan for a single plant can feel like an all-day task!

I’m probably being more dramatic, but let’s declare that I am a fan of spider plants because of how easy to care for them. Are you up for it? We’ll go over the following:

Sun Exposure

There’s a funny and vague term gardeners are used to hearing”bright indirect light. This level of exposure to sunlight means plants require light at times but not in the summer months and not always.

Bright indirect light could be located in the east or west-facing window, where the plant receives light during the coldest times in the morning. It may also mean that you are just a few feet from a window facing south to ensure it’s not directly in direct sunlight.

The main thing you need to ensure is that the plant is not exposed to direct sunlight. If this happens, leaves of the alocasia plant can quickly develop scorch on the leaves, and you’ll feel at ease each time you think of that time you put your tree in the incorrect spot.

Potting Mix

Another thing gardeners have come to hear is the importance of well-draining soil. Drainage is one of the essential elements to maintaining a variety of kinds of plants because the roots are the place where the magic happens.

Alocasia experts suggest the plant alocasia in a potting mix mixed with perlite, soil (or coarse potting sand), and a small amount of peat. This ensures that the mix is exceptionally well aerated and peat also adds the required amount of acidity in addition.

Potting your alocasia plants every two years is essential since they don’t want to be rooted bound. However, they don’t like having plenty of breathing space. Repot it in a slightly bigger pot so that it isn’t shocked by all the liberties it doesn’t desire.

Temperature

Alocasias can be quite sensitive to temperatures! They are not cold-hardy plant, in any way and must be kept out of drafty windows, basements, and most importantly, in the home of your frosty roommate since they do not clean the counters in your kitchen clean.

Ensure that the alocasia has not been subjected to a constant temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit and you’ll be good to go.

Watering

Watering alocasia is among the most straightforward conditions for growing to manage since it is likely to be incorporated into your other house the watering schedule of your plants. Alocasia plants thrive in moist soil but do not like soggy soil.

This means you must allow the top 2 inches of soil to dry if you want to water the plant again. Be sure to decrease how often you water during the winter season since the plant is dormant. This is when they are at risk of becoming prone to root rot.

Alocasia plants also love an optimum level of humidity. There are several ways: You can put your plant in the bathroom, where it will always be subject to the humid air of the shower, mist it frequently or place an unfilled tray with pebbles, water and pebbles underneath the pot to plant. Dealer’s choice!

Fertilizer

The Alocasia plant is also renowned for being an extremely heavy feeder. They require nutrients to develop those wild and unusual leaves, and they could use just a bit of assistance, especially when they’re growing and houseplants.

Make sure to feed your alocasia with fertilizer with high nitrogen every few weeks during the active growth season (nitrogen is the key ingredient in helping the super leafy plants).

Although these tips are clear and concise, of these advices (patting me on the back), It is crucial to remember that many different types of alocasias are not identical.

Every plant has its own specific needs based on the cultivar and species. Therefore, make sure you do the right amount of research before buying one and then taking care of it. You shouldn’t simply be a fan! Find out all you can be aware of, then attempt to grow one, so you won’t blame me alone when it doesn’t work.

What are Popular Types of Alocasia Plants?

Here are 18 most amazing cultivars of alocasia available. They are diverse in shape, size, and color; the most important thing is availability. You can find some at any plant shop specializing in specialty plants, while others you might never meet in your lifetime. The only thing they all share is that they’re unique, and I’d like each one.

1. Alocasia Amazonica ‘Polly.’

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Also known as African mask plants or Kris plants, The Alocasia Polly can be described as a hybrid of alocasia watsoniana and alocasia Sandersiana. It’s a blessing that this alocasia cultivar is easily available and shouldn’t be challenging to locate.

It is easy to identify the Alocasia Polly through its dark, green leaves, which appear thin with undulated leaf margins. They are obnoxious and thick with white veins. The entire plant will develop to grow at least 24 inches tall, and each leaf is approximately 16 inches long.

2. Alocasia Amazonica ‘Bambino’

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Alocasia amazonica ‘Bambino’ is almost identical to “Polly,” but she’s only a little gal! The dwarf variety is easily available, and if you cannot find it on shelves, you might be able to order it online relatively quickly.

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It’s a ‘Bambino’ because of its size, which is dimensions of only 12 inches and leaves of 6 inches. They sport the traditional arrowhead shape leaves that are dark green with silver veins however, flip it over to reveal a purple underside! Gorgeous!

3. Alocasia Zebrina

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Alocasia zebrina. This is a fascinating plant because she (I don’t understand why I keep calling plants by the name of I don’t know, but you’re getting me) is not just engaging in its leaves, but attractive stems too.

Alocasia zebrina first gets noticed by its stunning stems decorated with black and yellow stripes that resemble zebras. Alongside these are tiny green arrow-shaped leaves that are less ostentatious than most alocasia species. They’re taking a step back from the light source to let their leaves shine!

4. Alocasia Micholitziana ‘Frydek.’

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Alocasia Frydek is often referred to for its green velvet, and you’ll be able to recognize the reason when you see the leaves. They are rare; if you come across one, grab it regardless of price! Don’t, if you’re looking to be financially accountable!

Alocasia Frydek can be known for its dark green leaves, which have a more velvety appearance than shiny and are adorned with wrinkled edges and white veins. These giants can grow to heights of 2-4 feet, with leaves reaching an astonishing length of 18 inches.

5. Alocasia Reginula ‘Black Velvet.’

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Woof! Alocasia reginula “Black Velvet” is something to see. It is a striking lookin’ plant (that is in perfect harmony with its character, don’t you think?) and is undoubtedly one of the rarest cultivars.

Alocasia leaves that are black and velvety in appearance are stunning in both size and color. The leaves are so dark that they appear black under the lighting. They have silver veins and have a velvety look to the leaves. Black velvet from Alocasia is succulent in texture. They could reach twelve inches tall and the width is 18 inches! She’s bodacious!

You might also like this article: How to grow Alocasia Black Velvet

6. Alocasia Macrorrhiza

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Alocasia macrorrhiza is commonly known as the alocasia-stingray due to its uniquely designed wings that look like the Stingray’s body!

The alocasia stingray is a gigantic stingray. It can grow to over 6 feet tall, which adds to the drama of those stingray-shaped leaves. The leaves face upwards and also have a long, thin tail. They also have similar stems to zebra stripe stems as those of Alocasia the zebrina.

7. Alocasia Baginda ‘Silver Dragon Scale’

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Alocasia baginda is a highly sought-after and genuinely extraordinary baginda cultivar. It is sought-after due to its unique appearance and texture.

Silver dragons of the Alocasia region are famous for their lighter green leaves, highlighted by dark green veins, which create the appearance of the size of a massive scale. Alocasia silver dragon’s undersides are striking red, adding to the dramatic effect and texture.

Also, there is the “pink dragon” variation of the alocasia baginda. It is a very rare cultivar with dark green leaves that have silver veins and the same texture of scaly, however, the cultivar ‘pink dragon’ has beautiful light pink stems. It is also the case that it has one flower per stem, which gives the plant a more compact appearance.

8. Alocasia Melo/Alocasia Rugosa

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Although it is often referred to as Alocasia Melo, it’s often referred to as alocasia rugosa for its stunningly rough leaf texture. They are than ordinary but are as stunning as the other varieties in appearance.

Melo alocasia features distinctively large and tough green leaves. However, they can also be green and blue. The plant can grow to approximately 1-2 feet tall but leaves that are half that size. The beauty of the whole thing!

9. Alocasia Macrorrhizos ‘Giant Taro’

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Alocasia macrorrhizoa is called the elephant’s ears that are upright or the ivory coast. It is adored by those who garden indoors because of its amazing stature and wacky foliage that resembles elephant ears.

“Giant Taro” has massive leaves, with some measuring 3 feet long while the overall length of the plant is five feet high. The leaves of the elephant ear are dark green with a glossy texture. Alocasia’s ivory coast brings a tropical climate to your home.

10. Alocasia Lauterbachiana ‘Purple Sword.’

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Alocasia lauterbachiana “purple sword” is among the more unusual and rare varieties available. If you’ve ever seen one in person You’ll be amazed by the color of their leaves and form.

The purple sword is renowned for its broad and long leaves, designed exactly as the name suggests. The leaves are purple/copper with a scalloped edge. The plant is a high one, often reaching taller heights of up to 4 feet.

You might also want to read this article: Alocasia Lauterbachiana Care

11. Alocasia Cuprea ‘Red Secret’

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Alocasia cuprea “Red secret” is among the most uncommon varieties and quite a bit. How often do you come across a plant with pink flowers? They are a challenge to take care of and should be considered before purchasing one.

“Red secret” is a tropical-looking scent to it, with the leaves first appearing with a beautiful Iridescent effect. The leaves first appear as a subdued coppery-green with many pink shimmers.

As the plant develops, it’s going to change color. At times, the pink will be more noticeable; sometimes, it will be green, and sometimes the veins will turn black and sometimes wholly red! That’s why “secret” is in the name since you don’t know what you’ll receive!

12. Alocasia Longiloba

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Alocasia longiloba is an appealing cultivar, and it’s pretty readily available! This kind of foliage is also easy to take care of and is a good alternative if you’re just starting growing alocasia.

Alocasia longiloba is precisely that long. It grows up to 3 feet tall and has leaves that are as long! The classic arrow-shaped leaves are thick and wide. They’re blue green over the top, with silver veins and edges and the undersides purple with an eggplant hue! Wild!

13. Alocasia Sanderiana

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Alocasia sanderiana aka the kris plant, or Sander’s Alocasia, because of the shape of the leaves, like the Kalis sword, which is intricate and curly. Quite a fancy blade if you ask me.

Alocasia sanderiana is approximately 2 feet tall, which is easier to manage as an apartment plant. It also has large, glossy green leaves that are so dark, they’re almost black. They feature stunning white veins and margins, with their leaves purple underside.

14. Alocasia Wentii

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Alocasia goesii is commonly called The New Guinea shield or hardy elephant ear plant. It is a much more popular type and can be the perfect centerpiece to any table.

Alocasia goesii can be identified by its ruffled leaf texture, but the classic broad shape is distinctive to the whole family. The top leaves are rough, dark green, with an underside purple. These plants can reach more than 3 feet tall, and the leaves typically reach dimensions of up to 12 inches.

15. Alocasia Brancifolia ‘Pink Passion’

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Alocasia brancifolia is possibly the most recent cultivar to hit the market, and I’ve never known about this plant until now! It looks like the monstera plant, however, it has alocasia-like textures.

This is an extremely attractive plant that is not so much due to its coloring but with its texture and shape. Its leaf shape is like the Swiss cheese monstera; however, having a rougher texture and massive leaves of an alocasia. Neat!

16. Alocasia Cucullata ‘Hooded Dwarf.’

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Although the most common term is Alocasia cucullata, the dwarf with hood, I think the name used for Buddha’s palm is much more romantic and appropriate for this stunning tropical plant.

Although less striking than Buddha’s hand, it has appeal due to its delicate green stems and delicate green leaves that gently turn upwards like a hand waving and the slim stems gently moving the leaves with a gentle breeze.

17. Alocasia Infernalis ‘Black Magic.’

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We have saved the most sought-after and stunning variety of alocasia for the very last time. The alocasia infernalis “black magic is among the most dramatic and striking plants I’ve ever seen and I’ve written about hundreds of them.

The plant is extremely rare and has leaves that are dark green, they appear to be black. What makes them truly remarkable is their ability to be covered in metallic sheen and sometimes red or purple sparkle.

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These plants sport the traditional leaf shape that is typical of the family. the plant doesn’t seem to be particularly big also (only about 22 inches) however, the texture and rich hue of the plant makes this one among the most popular worldwide.

18. Alocasia maharani ‘Grey Dragon.’

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You’re right if you believe “Grey Dragon” and “Melo” resemble each other quite a bit; the two species are a cross between Alocasia rugosa “Melo” and Alocasia reginula. One of the most uncommon Alocasia types, it has subdued, silvery deep green leaves.

The size of “Grey Dragon” is slightly dwarfish in comparison to other plants of its genus. It seldom reaches a height of 14 inches, and its leaves can extend up to 6 inches.

Have you ever wondered why this family of plants has a green top of its leaves but a purple underside? Yes! Well, I know the answer however, you don’t know, and here’s the answer:

In most cases, when the leaves are concerned, the color of the leaves will reflect the amount of sunlight exposure the plant gets. Green leaves can absorb an enormous amount of sunlight, while dark leaves – such as purple – can’t and do not want to absorb the same amount of sunlight. This is because the green leaves have the highest amount of chlorophyll.

This is why the undersides of leaves turn purple when you’re talking about alocasia plants since they don’t have to photosynthesize! For other plants, if the plant gets too much sun, it can turn purple in the hope that it can’t photosynthesize as well. This could be harmful to some plants, but it’s similar to a chameleon changing skin color for others! No big deal!

Please share the photo below to your Pinterest board if you’ve liked our list of Alocasia plants!

Types of Alocasia (18 Alocasia Plants You'll Love)Pin

FAQs

What kinds of alocasia can you count?

Identifying all the alocasia varieties is challenging since they are innumerable cultivars that are coming out! There are 97 recognized species available, but there are many cultivars and hybrids that are available and new varieties are being introduced constantly.

Are there any varieties of the alocasia plant?

Alocasia macrorrhiza is an alocasia macrorrhiza variegated alocasia species. The term “variegated” plant signifies that the leaf color is multiple tones it, and its shades can change as the plant grows well.

What is the definition of a jewel alocasia?

Some may believe that an alocasia called a jewel is a distinct type of alocasia; it’s actually a variety of plants with a particular species of Alocasia. The jewel alocasia plant is an alocasia that is smaller in species that can be used for indoor use. The type of plant is quite significant in terms of dimensions and height, with some reaching up to 6 feet, while others are just 12 inches.

Where do the alocasia plants originate from?

Alocasia is a tropical plant species that is a natural plant that can be found in the wild across Southeast Asia along with eastern Australia but has been wildly well-known as a cultivable houseplant in recent times. Although they are in the wild in southeast Asia and eastern Australia, It is unusual for this plant to be naturalized elsewhere due to its unique demands for growing.

How much light do plants like alocasia require?

Ideally, an alocasia plant gets indirect sunlight. It isn’t easy to achieve the perfect balance of “bright indirect sunlight”; however, this type of exposure to sunlight means the plant needs light occasionally, not during the hot seasons but not always.

Bright indirect light could be located in the east or west-facing window, where the plant is illuminated during the most remarkable periods of daylight. It may also mean that you are only a few feet from a south-facing window to ensure it’s not directly to the sun.

What you should make sure is that the plant isn’t exposed to direct sunlight. If this is the case, the leaves of the alocasia plant can quickly develop scorch on the leaves and you’ll feel at ease each moment you think about the moment you placed the tree in the improper spot.

What kinds of pests can affect the alocasia plant?

As if the increasing requirements for alocasia plants were not complicated enough, they’re also susceptible to pest infestations like aphids, spider mites, or spider mites. Aphids, spider mites, and sap-sucking insects which can nest on the veins of the plant and take the essential nutrition and water that plants supply to the veins of the leaf.

They can be eliminated by hand or by spraying the whole plant with a mixture of antibacterial soap (my preferred one is Dr. Bronners) and letting it rest for a night before washing off this mixture and the insects in it.

What is the most frequent time I have to maintain my alocasia plants?

Alocasia watering is among the easiest conditions to remember since it can follow other aspects of your home watering routine for your plants. Alocasia plants thrive in damp soil but not soggy soil.

This means you must let the top two inches of soil dry if you want to water your plant once more. Reducing your watering frequency during winter is essential because the plant has gone dormant. This is the time when they are the most vulnerable to becoming rot-prone.

Alocasia plants also enjoy the humidity levels that they have. There are several ways: You can put your plant in a bathroom area where it will always be subject to the humid air of the shower, mist it often or place pebbles in a tray and water under the planter pot. Dealer’s choice!

Do plants in alocasia require fertilizer?

The Alocasia plant is also noted as being an extremely heavy feeder. They require nutrients to develop the wild and bizarre leaves and may significantly use some assistance when they’re growing, as well as house plants.

Make sure to feed your alocasia with an agronomic fertilizer with high nitrogen levels every few weeks during the active growth season (nitrogen is the key ingredient in helping the super leafy plants).

Does an alocasia plant require to be cut back?

Alocasia plants don’t have to be pruned to keep them healthy. Removing stems and leaves that are damaged or infested or look sickly or discolored is best. In other words, keep the pruning shears in it!

What is the most suitable potting mix to use for your Alocasia plant?

A proper drainage system is one of the essential components of taking care of many kinds of plants. The root systems are the place where the magic happens.

Alocasia experts suggest that it is best to plant alocasia in a potting mix that’s partially soil, part perlite (or coarse potting sand), and a small amount of peat. This ensures that the mix is well-aerated and peat also adds the acidity needed.

Potting your alocasia plants every two years is essential since they do not want to be root bound. However, they don’t like having plenty of breathing space. Repot it only in a slightly bigger pot to ensure it doesn’t get awed by all the freedom it does not need.

Why is the alocasia plant so challenging to maintain?

Cultivating exotic plants in North America is indeed tricky. It’s because we don’t have the same climate conditions as the tropics do! The care of plants from the tropics in a climate that isn’t suitable for it will be the same as keeping reptiles as pets because you need to build its own microbiome to remain alive.

The reason is that the temperature isn’t just appropriate, nor is the humidity, nor the number of time in the day or the power of sun’s rays which is present in North America is the same as Southeast Asia or Australia, you must constantly replicate the conditions with making sure you are watering, heating and fertilizing your plant to make it feel at home within its natural growth range. It’s not an easy task!

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